Webhelp Set To Showcase Digital Transformation At Industry Event

Webhelp, one of the country’s leading business process outsourcers (BPO), has announced today it will host a digital transformation session at Customer Focus Live 2016, taking place at London’s Waldorf Hilton Hotel on Tuesday 10th May.

Challenged with a long-term digital transformation agenda, Mike Purvis, chief engagement officer at Webhelp, will explore and discuss the company’s innovative transformational partnership with a major retailer.

The session itself will provide practical insight into transforming customer experience, with a spotlight on webchat in particular. Mike will highlight the introduction of advanced web chat platforms, showcasing how paying attention to each individual touch point will create a more robust omnnichannel experience.

He will also discuss the key objectives of the retail partnership and outline how Webhelp’s strategy is helping the brand to meet its strategic objective of becoming a world class digital retailer.

Mike commented on the upcoming session, saying: “Breaking down our journey to complete customer experience transformation, we must break down the journey and its associated touch points.

“Our session will provide a relevant example of how businesses can fundamentally transform with the support of the right outsource partner.”

Customer Focus Live is an international event which houses the industry’s foremost innovators in Customer Experience.

The programme highlights organisations that stand-out in their customer-centric approach, yet also features those trying to change perceptions, traditions and strategy to transform their organisation for a new customer-centric era.


Wouldn’t You Rather Not Call Me?

“Millenials” (anyone born between 1981 and 2000) are a demanding group of customers...

The first generation with access to instant communication, they expect service at any time and on the channels that they choose. It is largely the demands of millennials that have turned the voice customer contact channel from the default into one of many – including social networks. This also means that they are the most open to new ideas and new ways to get help. If your company creates an online digital help system that makes it easy to find self-service information, as opposed to calling for help, millennial customers will be the most likely to use it and the easiest to coach.

The so-called ‘broadcast generation’ – people between 35 and 55 – are also likely to prefer helping themselves, if possible, but they may need a little support. If your customer experience advisors can coach these customers on finding information then it may take a little extra time on an initial call, but it will prove a worthwhile investment in the long run by preventing further calls in the future.

The over-55 customer often has a lot of buying power and more time than other demographics. They may need more support than the other groups when it comes to digital self-service, but they can be successfully coached if advisors are allowed to invest the required time and effort.

Hiring your own team of digital natives – millennials who have only ever known a range of communication technologies – is a great approach to building a truly contemporary contact centre. You need to create an environment where the team can not only serve customers, but also coach them in how to find the answers without calling again. Your advisors should be able to share information and guide customers to the answers regardless of the demographic group of the customer.

What do you think of millennials and their preference for online information? Can coaching really deflect calls away from the contact centre if time is invested in showing customers how to serve themselves?

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Download our FREE 'Digital Coaching' paper now

Two years ago Deloitte made the bold prediction that in Retail, by 2020, physical stores would be replaced by “showrooms” with store assistants guiding customers to purchase online.

Could we see the same thing occur in contact centres across all sectors...with advisors resolving the customer’s problems and then helping them to serve themselves in the future?

In our new Digital Coaching paper we look at whether the role of the customer experience advisor could eventually evolve to become that of a “digital coach”, using their skills to help reduce future contact volumes and drive increased sales online.

Click the image below to access the free paper now.


Coaching To Self-Serve

Customer experience coaches drive satisfaction online

The retail sector is leading the way, with the likes of John Lewis and Burberry replacing stores with showrooms and assistants with consultants who carry tablets instead of standing behind tills.

The appeal is obvious; with substantial cost benefits to retailers that can effectively integrate their in-store and online shopping experience – and it is inspiring a similar shift in other sectors too and in their contact centres.

A self-service solution

Smartphones enable all of us to talk less and type more. As more consumers choose to shop online, they increasingly want their customer service delivered digitally too. One way of making an efficient digital service a reality is steering customers towards self-service options. However, it goes without saying that for the businesses who want to achieve this, the digital environment they create for their customers must be exceptional. Think about your airline app which guides you from flight deals, through flight notifications, a home for your boarding pass, to checklists for travel. Once you can offer a trusted digital experience, the role of the customer experience advisor can switch from ‘problem solver’ to ‘digital coach’.

Let’s say a customer phones a contact centre to check the delivery time for a new mobile phone they have ordered. The advisor gives them the information they need, but also offers to coach them on accessing that information on the customer app. As they talk through how to check order status, the ‘digital coach’ can show their customer where to view bills, where to find shopping offers and how to have a live chat. They might offer to send the customer a link to download an app for their phone, which they can use to track their orders and shop in the future.

That customer has now become a self-service shopper – one who doesn’t need to call again regarding this issue, and who has a direct line of contact with the retailer installed on their smartphone.

Intelligent design

So why would a customer experience outsourcer like Webhelp promote a self-service strategy? Surely we are talking ourselves out of a job?

Your outsourced contact centre should be rewarded not on the cost savings they can achieve, but rather the value that they can add. To enable your people to coach their customers, call times will undoubtedly increase. Advisors need to invest real time coaching customers along their digital journey – this means that they will also have the greatest insight into the best way to design, or redesign, a retailer’s website.

We’ve seen first-hand how self-service can succeed. We held a session with one of our clients, Shop Direct, where one of our advisors flagged a simple change to the way payment options were displayed. This slashed the number of queries, leading to a significant revenue boost as operating costs went down.

Coaching customers

Central to all this are the advisors who interact with customers every day. Long gone are the days where advisors were phone operators reading from scripts, today they are digitally literate experts who work across multiple channels to support customers of all ages, from savvy young digital natives to the ‘broadcast generation’ aged 35 to 55, as well as older consumers with strong buying power.

Although the perception is that people of a certain age rarely use the internet, the number of older users is actually growing. According to the Office for National Statistics, the proportion of over 75s who use the internet grew from 24 per cent in 2011 to 39 per cent in 2015. These users typically have the time to be coached by advisors, who are trained to listen, empathise, check for understanding and congratulate success.

It’s about capturing the moment and using it to achieve three results for the customer: resolve their initial enquiry, give them a digital solution they can use next time and boost the brand by generating customer satisfaction. Do that, and you will recruit an army of online brand ambassadors who will happily share their positive customer experiences.

Already, more than 40 per cent of all customer contact is delivered digitally, and by the end of this year voice will make up the minority of contacts.

Don’t be left hanging on the telephone.

Author: Helen Murray

Download our FREE 'Digital Coaching' paper now

Two years ago Deloitte made the bold prediction that in Retail, by 2020, physical stores would be replaced by “showrooms” with store assistants guiding customers to purchase online.

Could we see the same thing occur in contact centres across all sectors...with advisors resolving the customer’s problems and then helping them to serve themselves in the future?

In our new Digital Coaching paper we look at whether the role of the customer experience advisor could eventually evolve to become that of a “digital coach”, using their skills to help reduce future contact volumes and drive increased sales online.

Click the image below to access the free paper now.


Is Simplicity The Answer For A Great Customer Experience?

I recently heard The Modern Customer podcast with Blake Morgan interviewing Margaret Molloy, the Chief Marketing Officer of Siegel and Gale. The focus of the podcast was that simplicity is the key to a great customer experience.

This is a view I strongly echo, although it is easy to see why some might not believe it. We are operating in a world where the customer journey has changed beyond recognition in the past few years and major aspects of customer behaviour, such as loyalty, have been turned upside down. The conventional wisdom and experience of how to work with customers to provide great service has changed enormously in a very short period of time.

So how can simplicity be the answer? I believe that to create a great experience we need to see the journey from the eyes of the customer. Think of a customer who wants to ask a brand a question, but then faces these various scenarios:

1. An online shopper hesitates before a purchase and wants to ask about the products in their basket, but cannot find any way to easily contact the brand. Even searching the website reveals little more than an email address, yet they are in the midst of a purchase and need help now.

2. A customer took the time to email details of a history of a problem and after not hearing from the brand for several hours, so they try calling. They are asked to repeat everything they wrote in the email because the agent has no way of seeing information sent from a customer using a different channel.

3. A customer is using the app of a major brand and wants to ask a question, but it seems the only way to get help is to leave the app to make a call or go to the brand website.

I could go on, but the point is clear. In almost every situation where a customer needs help and is inclined to reach out to a brand with a question, are you making it easy and simple for the customer? If not then you have failed to ensure that the customer can easily find assistance – even if the assistance they might eventually get is great.

You can listen to the Modern Customer podcast via Forbes here: