Can the Crisis Curve create a roadmap for CX transformation and stability?

As well as the tragic cost in human lives, the COVID-19 crisis continues to create instability at every level for global industry. While it is too early to accurately forecast the full implications and severity, Group MD and CEO for UK, SA and India David Turner suggests that senior-level insight combined with informed and decisive action could be the key to better outcomes for CX providers.

To steal a timely phrase from JRR Tolkien; it's a dangerous business, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don't keep your feet, there's no knowing where you might be swept off to.

It has never been more important for our industry to maintain a firm footing during the turbulent environment created by COVID-19. It’s clear that, along with the catastrophic impact on global health and radical curtailment of our social freedoms, the pandemic has brought a series of rapid changes and challenges in the delivery of CX, impacting our clients, their customers, and of course, our people.

As businesses begin to take their first tentative steps out of this extraordinary crisis, Gobeyond Partners, part of the Webhelp Group, have created a succinct analysis to identify and explain the key stages we should expect to encounter.

Mark Palmer, Gobeyond Partners CEO, recognises that the political, social, and economic rules for business have been radically altered and that:

“Although the impact of the crisis, and this associated shift, will vary across country, industry, and organisation, we are seeing a distinct phasing of business and operational responses as we slowly make this transition. We call this ‘The Crisis Curve’.” 

Mark further identifies five clear phases resulting from crisis; rapid crisis response, take back control, business as unusual (BAU), transition to new normal and finally crisis futureproofing.

Crisis Curve graph

My personal view is that companies will be able to utilise this model to inform strategy and predict future trends, something that could be invaluable at this point, when it’s obvious that many brands and business are still struggling at the first hurdle.

In term of rapid response, at Webhelp, we have been transparent about the significant challenges we met to mobilise our resources at breakneck speed. Within two weeks we created a safe and stable home workforce of 7,000 connected individuals, which is growing as more clients reach out to us for rapid off-site solutions.

Our response to this problem was both ethical and agile, as Helen Murray, explains in her COVID-19 response blog:

“As a people-first business, taking a human approach to this crisis has been a logical step, which has meant rapidly looking at ways to increase our infrastructure to support homeworking where possible. While this solution won’t be suited to every operation, it is something that we will continue to look at and develop in the months ahead, in partnership and responding to the needs of our clients.”

The next stage Mark addresses, centres on taking back control – which could prove to be the economic tipping point in many sectors, as the financial impact of COVID-19 really starts to bite. This will be an especially difficult time for those brands or sectors, which either lack knowledge and expertise, or refuse to adapt. The exception to this rule will be companies that are sitting comfortably in the black financially, who can afford to make a choice to wait it out.

Operations will face considerable stress as they adapt to employee issues like furlough, self-isolation and remote working plus the inevitable changes in stock and supply. But, I believe that flexibility and access to skilled human resources will be the true factor in enabling successful business transformation.

It may not have been a straight path, but at Webhelp, we have now confidently taken back control for our clients, both on and off site. And encouragingly, the new homeworking operations are performing better than expected, in a very short time frame, which is a compliment to the resilience and adaptability of our people.

In South Africa, the Customer Engagement Industry has worked together in a unique collaboration with clients, industry bodies and the government, to create a robust CX platform and to safeguard jobs and their economy. Our passionate teams have been at the forefront of this endeavour.

The forthcoming BAU phase could benefit those companies who need to successfully pivot their service structure, to sustain and generate new revenue streams.

Gobeyond Partners believe that crucially, this is the point at which operating models start to permanently shift, which will require a renewed focus from leadership teams on performance optimisation, transformational programmes and some medium term investment. If done well this could be key to creating competitive advantage.

And customers will be carefully watching this stage too, as Craig Gibson, Chief Commercial Officer for the UK region comments in his recent blog:

Companies will also be remembered for the way they adapted ways of working to support their people, during a time when the public focus is (understandably) on unity and standing together.”

I believe that by considering and responding to the parameters of the crisis curve, we can begin to create an informed roadmap. Watch this space for a new series of blogs, interviews and studies, exploring how CX transformation can help customer experience providers ride the curve, navigate changing forecasts and guide their customers safely through the storm.

Read Mark’s article here, find out more about our stance on the COVID-19 crisis, and read my further thoughts on how this challenge will create a radical shift in the future of homeworking


The importance of emotional connection with customers during the Coronavirus.

Craig Gibson, Chief Commercial Officer for the Webhelp UK region, reveals how brands can use emotional connection, integrity and unity to draw us closer, as the distance between us increases due to the Coronavirus.

Emotion. Unity. Connection. 

These themes are everywhere we look at the moment. From the heartfelt children’s rainbow pictures in our windows, and chalked onto our pavements, to the frequent government communications that urge us (young and old) to curb our social interactions and stay home for the good of all society.

And across the UK, every Thursday, millions of us have been clapping alone, but together. We stand united in our universal support of the hardworking NHS and emergency staff. Our passionate applause and shouts spread positivity and illustrate the power of the very human desire to connect – across the physical distance that separates us.

Emotions are high, and rightly so – and in the business arena we have begun to see how this tide of feeling can quickly turn against brands and companies who misjudge the force and direction of the national view-point.

It’s hard for brands to find the right way through this, as they are in the unenviable position of balancing customer benefit against operational stability, and with the growing media attention it’s easy to fall foul of public opinion.

Dave Pattman, Managing Director CX Services at Gobeyond Partners, a Webhelp company, reminds us that in the pre-Covid world, discussion of how brands should make emotional connections was focused on the emotional state of the customer and how brands should detect and empathise with this, and that:

“An interesting impact of Covid is that organisations themselves have become much stronger emotional entities in their own right. They are now judged by how they have cared for their people, and how they have transformed themselves to support the community and frontline services.”

However, he concludes that this surge of emotion does not always lead to positive outcomes:

“There will also be ramifications based on how they have reacted to the fear of not being able to survive economically with fight or flight. This includes how pro-active or protracted the process has been for customers to cancel subscriptions or get refunds.”

He goes on to say that these emotional reactions will certainly have been strongly felt by customers, who have been facing stresses of their own.

In many respects the current crisis has revealed the depth of emotional sincerity in the connections between brands and their customers.  It is at times like these that the difference between deeply held values and more superficial marketing activities is revealed.

But there are some positive stories, and the Forbes Coronavirus Champions list makes interesting reading, as it documents the global brands that they feel are getting it right during this crisis.

And, companies closer to home have risen to the challenge, like Pret a Manger who are providing NHS discounts and food retailers like Sainsbury’s and Asda, through their work  prioritising vulnerable customers.

Webhelp CEO for the UK Region David Turner; believes that the emotional and financial turmoil brought by COVID-19 brings a tipping point in customer relationships for companies, and urges them to look at the bigger picture by saying:

“In the panic brought by the Coronavirus, brands could easily become caught up in the demands of the moment – and to forget that they have long-term relationships to maintain with their customers and employees. I’d encourage brands to step up during times of need, as this can really make a difference… and unfortunately for brands that can’t – it won’t go unnoticed!”

Interestingly, the in-depth research in the Webhelp Whitepaper on Emotional Connection provides us with a pre-COVID-19 benchmark for the level of emotional connection with sectors – and it will be very revealing to see how new relationships evolve in the post pandemic world.

It is already becoming clear that some industries will come out of this crisis with a different and more meaningful relationship with their customers - for example the technology sector.

Our original research showed that the technology sector was an area in which a third of us had emotionally connected with brands, and it is easy to speculate that this figure will continue to grow.

In fact, as more people work from home and maintain social distance, the pandemic has increased reliance on services from the technology sector, with the New York Times concluding that:

“While the rest of the economy is tanking from the crippling impact of the coronavirus, business at the biggest technology companies is holding steady — even thriving.”

Source: Big Tech Could Emerge From Coronavirus Crisis Stronger Than Ever

We expect that this reliance will extend into telecoms and media, as connectivity becomes so much more important to communities in lockdown.

Andrew Hall, Director: Strategic Engagements at Webhelp, an industry specialist in innovation and strategy in customer engagement, hits the nail on the head here, saying:

“There is no doubt that the pandemic has radically shifted online behaviour, with a rapid increase in the use of news and social channels, as people look for connection, reassurance and information during the pandemic.”

He goes on to explain that:

“With this societal shift to online communication, conversations with brands will increasingly move into the digital realm, radically altering how people communicate – which could have a lasting impact. Brands will have a unique opportunity to build emotional connection as they react and respond to this new conversation!”

As online content increases, so will the need for swift and professional moderation, which Andrew recognises, commenting:

“We are likely to see a boom in content moderation services, but the companies who will really succeed in this area are those who use insight to understand and act on the current level of heightened emotion and respond with empathy alongside speed and accuracy.”

With capacity to create good online experiences and positive associations, these sectors will gain by increasing amounts of emotional connection across demographics - and brands that support this sector well, will reap the benefits.

In a nutshell, brands that inspire human emotion during this difficult period will build better relationships.

Moreover, emotion has been linked to heightened learning and memory,* especially in areas of motivation and attention, so any positive experiences customers have during this difficult time will affect their decisions long after this crisis has passed.

Companies will also be remembered for the way they adapted ways of working to support their people, during a time when the public focus is (understandably) on unity and standing together. Helen Murray, Chief Customer Solutions Officer, has shared our efforts on this front in her recent blog, where she comments:

“As the reality of the pandemic hit home, the most important and challenging task was to ensure the safety of our people.”

And, as a people-first business, committed to supporting essential services, we want to open a conversation on the value of connection and to encourage brands to communicate and act for their customers and employees in the most human way they can.

Over the coming months our new game-changers series will be looking at how emotion can be used to create mutually beneficial bonds between customers, employees and brands, whilst exploring the data and dynamics that can reinforce and create these connections, and the lessons we can learn from the impact of the Coronavirus.

In addition, in collaboration with Gobeyond Partners, part of the Webhelp Group, we will taking an in-depth look at the expected phases of the pandemic for business, with a guide to the Crisis Curve and what it will mean for the future of CX.

Find out about our stance on the COVID 19 crisis here, and read UK Group CEO, David Turner’s thoughts on how this challenge will create a radical shift in the future of homeworking.

*The Influences of Emotion on Learning and Memory - NCBI

 


Industry collaboration during the Covid-19 crisis in South Africa

South Africa is approaching the end of four weeks in lockdown during a time when the Coronavirus has shaken the world’s health organisations and financial systems to the core as well as altered the face of the global BPO sector. Here Brandon Aitken, Chief Commercial Officer for Webhelp South Africa, reflects on the groundbreaking level of industry collaboration that has occurred, which may be unique to South Africa. 

As the impact of COVID-19 began to hit home, BPO leaders quickly realized that swift and decisive action was urgently needed to prevent devastating ramifications for the sector, a critical pillar of job creation for our country. This industry creates tens of thousands of jobs and contributes billions to the nation’s economy. In fact, over 50,000 young South Africans work in BPO for international clients, with significantly more supporting the domestic market.

We knew that the impact from COVID-19 was inevitable, but that protecting our people and minimising the loss of business and jobs was absolutely critical. As the stakes were high, our actions would be fundamental to both the future of the industry, and the economy.

Unique industry collaboration

At Webhelp, we were incredibly heartened to see the willingness with which key players, including competitors and their stakeholders swiftly came together to address and resolve the challenges faced - to make sure that the industry comes out of this crisis in the strongest position possible, safeguarding the people at the heart of the sector, and their jobs.

This unique collaboration has not just been limited to BPO providers and industry bodies such as Business Process Enabling South Africa (BPESA), the Cape Town and Western Cape tourism and investment agency (WESGRO) and the national trade association for the hospitality industry (FEDHASA). There has also been strong and active support for the sector from all areas of Government, including the Presidency, national, local and provincial authorities and law enforcement.

Some of the industry problems that we are trying to solve together include trying to activate home working in the Western Cape, for nearly 8000 young people providing non-essential services. This would add to the nearly 3000 people delivering essential services already for international and domestic clients.

Keeping our people safe and responding to change

One of the first tests we faced was how to deal with the frequency of the  changes the regulations issued and how to best interpret these for our sector considering the levels of ambiguity, not least of which was the accurate qualification  of essential services.

However, the most urgent piece of work was undoubtedly to protect our people on site, by stringently adhering to all the government guidelines. Followed by the logistical challenges in the transportation and connection of IT assets as we enabled our non-essential people to work safely from home.

Inevitably, there have been a variety of challenges raised toward the industry which have impaired how quickly we have been able to sustain our delivery of essential services and attracted some negative press. ,We do however realise that the intentions have been to hold us to account collectively, something that we appreciate and have responded to.

South Africa First approach

The problems we have faced are not unique to our industry; but I believe that the collaborative effort has been a unique differentiating factor that we should be proud of.  We must recognise the significant contribution that BPESA has made in bringing us together, under a “South Africa First” approach. They have worked tirelessly to make connections, inform decisions and safeguard both job sustainability and our people.

They have aided stakeholder collaboration across the private and public sectors in several key areas: gaining clarity on the interpretations of directives, and subsequent revisions, obtaining support from law enforcement to allow the free movement of our essential services workers and facilitating the supply of essential goods to maintain compliance to protocol, including facemasks and sanitizer. Finally, the BPESA teams have driven collaboration with enabling services, such as data provision for home workers and with the FEDHASA to help create a temporary home working environment for teams providing essential services.

The pace at which BPESA mobilised to support and generate engagement was pivotal in creating a unified effort aligned to policy and government directives, and the whole industry owes them a huge debt of thanks.

Building integrity and trust

Some other positives can be drawn from these unusual circumstances. BPO business leaders have made themselves available, at all times, to act as a mutual sounding board on the fast moving issues as they have arisen. The openness, collaboration and accountability shown has helped to establish industry integrity, as has the introduction of a comprehensive self-certification process.

Suppliers that have embraced flexibility have seen new opportunities arising with clients that are heavily reliant on other traditional BPO regions and which have experienced a loss of supply during this crisis. Working together, our prompt response has created enhanced trust in BPO in South Africa through our ability to offset some of that disruption.

The swift and stable rise in homeworking bodes well for the future of this operating model for our sector, and early indications are that it is working well.

Looking ahead to the future

However, as a sector we must continue be alert to the pace of change, in order to maintain this positive momentum. We must avoid complacency at all costs and look carefully at the wider issues affecting both our communities and the industry.

There are many potential ramifications if the lockdown extends past the end of April. Further disruption to the national workforce could create new social, economic and community tipping points and our industry must continue to be conscientious in creating timely and relevant support to put our people first in these areas.

On a personal level, I am extremely proud of our own people who, where possible, have kept providing exceptional service to our clients and their customers. Their resilience has proved that home working works; paving a way for the future. In particular, those who continue to provide essential services, both from home and from our offices deserve exceptional admiration as those services continue to run at a relentless pace.

We thank all of the stakeholders and industry peers who have worked so tirelessly with us to help BPO in South Africa to continue to thrive. Most of all, we thank our people for staying positive and representing South Africa so well during this time.

One thing is certain, sadly, this crisis is far from over, and the way we continue to approach these future challenges together, will set the pattern for industry growth and resilience into 2021 and beyond.


Facing the challenges of the coronavirus

Business priorities are shifting as the world rapidly adjusts to the devastating changes brought by the Coronavirus. Here, Helen Murray, Chief Customer Solutions Officer, for the Webhelp UK region, looks at how this sweeping force has brought challenges to our business, the astonishing efforts made to meet them, and why our people are always central to everything we do.   

I was recently asked what have been the biggest challenges for us as a business, in responding to COVID-19.

At Webhelp, our number one priority is always our people, and as the stark reality of the pandemic began to hit home across our countries, the most important and challenging task was to ensure their safety and well-being, first and foremost.

This is not empty rhetoric, but something that we honestly live by at Webhelp – and this vision is led strongly from the c-suite. We created specific task forces at all levels of the business - moved swiftly in partnership with our clients to change our way of working across all our operations, to protect our people and to stringently follow all government guidelines to safeguard their health.

There was a wider human issue impacting our operations too - as many of our operations fall under “key worker” categories, as defined by the Cabinet Office and Department of Education, we were also driven by a clear responsibility to support and maintain the supply of critical services.

Our teams are committed to assisting vital service areas which include; helping the telecommunications sector keep people connected, aiding the food retail sector by safeguarding deliveries, assisting insurance services clients to give access to information on claims and renewals and finally allowing the transport sector to keep delivering vital supplies to homes and businesses - all of which is so important at this critical time!

We are actively diverting resources to where they are needed most, and in partnership with some of our clients, prioritising and supporting the most vulnerable of our customers.

In fact, to put this in perspective - almost 7000 (and rising) UK Region Webhelp employees are now working from home. The logistics alone were considerable, and over the last few weeks our operations, IT and support teams have been working round the clock to deliver a viable solution.

As you can imagine, this was a highly complex situation, meeting bespoke technological and regulatory conditions, as required on a client by client basis.

Our teams have now delivered a robust custom built solution which includes a staggering 46 miles of internet cabling (enough to run between Glasgow and Edinburgh!), deployed and configured 10,000 VPN licences and built 12,000 machines, and delivered enough network capacity to stream 500 HD movies every second!

The challenge continues across some of our sites, where we are limiting the number of people to a minimum to create as much distance as possible.

We have brought in our own internal auditing, completed throughout the day to check all safe levels are being maintained and have a highly visible communications campaign, which highlights all our social distancing practices.

As new guidelines are announced, either by UK or local authorities, we are acting on that advice or seeking clarity, as required.

As well as the obvious technical issues, rapidly expanding a remote workforce requires support in many other areas. We are helping our people to adapt with regular advice and assistance; by making sure they have connectivity, are set up correctly and are comfortable working in their new environment.

Home-working policies have been updated and communicated, providing clear guidance on time management, GDPR and structuring the working day at home.

Both in the office and remotely, colleagues are being provided with advice on how to manage stress and help to look after their mental and physical health. This includes specific Webhealth initiatives and access to Care First our employee assistance program.

A transformation has occurred in where, when and how we communicate and engage with our people, as we have had to re-consider and expand our channels and look carefully at accessibility issues and overall effectiveness.

This has significantly changed the way corporate communications are now being delivered, for example we have increased our use of closed social media groups, to engage our people in their homes and during non-working hours, making absolutely sure that they can readily access the support they need.

I personally feel that the speed in which we were able to mobilise and transition so many colleagues to homeworking across the UK region has been hugely impressive. Our people have really embraced the change and have adapted incredibly well to a new way of working in a very short space of time. It speaks volumes on their quality and commitment, our strong culture and the agility of the business.

As a people-first business, taking a human approach to this crisis has been a logical step, which has meant rapidly looking at ways to increase our infrastructure to support homeworking where possible. While this solution won’t be suited to every operation, it is something that we will continue to look at and develop in the months ahead, in partnership and responding to the needs of our clients.

Find out about our stance on the COVID 19 crisis here, and read UK Group CEO, David Turner’s thoughts on how this challenge will create a radical shift in the future of homeworking.


Webhelp Enterprise: Pursuing a Seamless Digital Experience through Technology with a Human Touch

This is the third installment of a series of interviews conducted by Stephen Loynd of market intelligence firm TrendzOwl with Etienne Turion, CEO, Webhelp Enterprise Sales, regarding the B2B sales market in the United States.

Stephen Loynd, Principal Analyst, TrendzOwl:

In our previous installment, we had a great discussion around the importance of nurturing quality salespeople in the world of B2B sales. Today I’d like to dive a little deeper into the technology theme.

Etienne Turion, CEO, Webhelp Enterprise Sales:

We start with people, but over time technology will become an ever more important part of the equation. In Forrester’s 2020 marketing and sales predictions, they found that 52% of customer obsessed firms prioritize technology investments that create differentiated CX.

Now, we’ve talked about how the speed with which large amounts of information comes at buyers is a challenge. Decision-makers are often overwhelmed. The B2B customer is therefore in search of a seamless experience that is efficient, personalized, and relatively fast all along the customer journey. In other words, today’s typical B2B customer seeks real value. Expectations have risen in the B2B world, and it’s no longer enough to depend on the old ways of doing things, including out-of-date sales strategies.

Not surprisingly then, from the online to the offline worlds, achieving an omnichannel experience will be everything. Companies simply must accommodate themselves to this new reality and be thinking in new ways during a time of disruption. Doubtless part of that means seeking out strategic partners to help them cope with the exponential technological change you’ve mentioned. And by the way, according to a Forrester Analytics Global Business Technographics Marketing Survey from 2018, in order to keep pace, global B2B marketers spend, on average, 22% of their marketing budget on technology.

Stephen Loynd, Principal Analyst, TrendzOwl:

OK, so we agree that technology is transforming B2B sales. The new technology stack includes tools such as: cloud-based CRM systems that aid the sales process; salespeople boosting selling power through social media; sales automation tools that cut down on manual sales processes; predictive analytics leveraging the explosion of Big Data, etc.

What is Webhelp doing to keep pace?

Etienne Turion, CEO, Webhelp Enterprise Sales:

Well, Webhelp Enterprise Sales is streamlining the buying journey and modernizing the B2B sales role by investing in new analytical tools. Forrester talks about the need to build a journey measurement framework by defining injourney signals and end-of-journey success metrics. That’s certainly true for a B2B purchasing journey. This is important. After all, frictionless journeys will dominate tomorrow’s B2B landscape, often complemented by self-service.

Our strategy starts with a solid lead generation engine powered by data and maintained by monitoring and constant client communication. The process moves through a number of stages in detecting and scoring leads, including data mining and cleansing, segmentation, website activity tracking and collecting feedback from targeted prospects. These new digital tools can create opportunities by liberating agents’ time, while also offering the opportunity to create more emotional connections with customers. In its 2020 marketing and sales predictions, Forrester notes that 58% of “customer obsessed” firms separate themselves by regularly mining customer insights to inform business decisions.

In other words, as technology changes the way people sell, sales is also becoming increasingly complex; hence the need to leverage innovations such as digitization, data analytics, AI, etc. And so Webhelp is making it easier for sales reps to navigate what are often complicated buying processes by reducing administrative and technical burdens.

Stephen Loynd, Principal Analyst, TrendzOwl:

So, in a sense, it sounds like you’re looking to technology to help capture a single view of the customer. But how easy is that, really?

Etienne Turion, CEO, Webhelp Enterprise Sales:

That’s a core principle of the Webhelp approach – to assemble a single view. Customer data platforms help drive sales analytics, generating better results. But you’re right to suggest that isn’t necessarily easy. There are many moving parts. The first challenge is to better understand the targets, upstream, in particular through analytically optimized data in order to create a finer segmentation and to carry out highly targeted marketing initiatives.

At the same time, Webhelp maintains strong links between the marketing department and the product and solution specialists on its B2B sales teams. This enables fast, effective message delivery and allows it to base cross- and upselling strategy on insights like Voice of the Customer (VoC).

Stephen Loynd, Principal Analyst, TrendzOwl:

Could you talk a bit more about AI specifically?

Etienne Turion, CEO, Webhelp Enterprise Sales:

Yes. Part of that process I’ve been describing means tapping into AI-powered systems that gather as much accurate, updated, complete, and diverse (potential) customer data as possible. But it’s hard. According to Forrester, more than 70% of the B2B marketers they surveyed said data management is an organizational weakness, while only 12% said they had high confidence in the quality of the customer data they manage.

But Webhelp is using speech analytics and conversational AI to overcome such weaknesses and improve sales. For example, we’re currently collaborating with the AI team of a certain tech giant in order to uncover conversation factors that drive sales conversion. The collaboration will utilize the cognitive services within the partner’s solution and develop an approach to coaching that’s focused on key factors driving performance.

Ultimately, B2B leaders are building stronger capabilities in data science and data management, AI and machine learning (ML), and agile product development. The implication is that human beings should be able to sell more, at a faster rate, but also sell better. Which is why Webhelp’s inside sales approach is more akin to full account management than standard telesales. And so Webhelp pursues a thorough planning and alignment process – from scope assessment and recruitment to knowledge transfer and the creation of an IT environment – before launching any inside sales campaign. All the while, Webhelp systematically presents ideas to clients on how best to innovate during quarterly business reviews.

It’s all about melding people with technology, two forces working in concert so as to boost B2B sales at a time of unprecedented change.

 

Summary: the Digitization of Inside Sales

Webhelp Enterprise Sales is staying aligned with the shift to a technology-enabled future. And part of its value proposition is integrating the initial part of the buyer’s journey into a process even before its team engages directly with the client. Sales and marketing look to remain in sync throughout. Some client companies will prefer to engage only for inside sales, some only for analytics, and some for a complete end-to-end solution. According to Etienne Turion, Webhelp aims to get leads to salespeople seamlessly through the two following pillars:

Analytics. This specialty focuses on using analytics to segment the market and examine things like the propensity to consume based on trends and other client related data. It’s sophisticated data management (especially for SMBs). It makes the sales force more accurate and efficient in what they do, cutting down on “cold call selling for nothing.”

Demand Center. This is where Webhelp is able to design campaigns based on segmentation and personalization through digital tools. Data is integrated into additional marketing tools, helping to support Account Based Management (ABM). And marketing automation allows Webhelp to be in contact with many more people through a digital conversation. Thanks to the smart use of technology, the entire process is highly accurate and brings in more qualified leads.

 

Would you like to know more about our solutions?

Etienne TurionContact

Etienne Turion
Mobile: +33(0)6 85 52 76 10
Email: etienne.turion@webhelp.com


How COVID-19 will create a revolution in flexible working

As the coronavirus (COVID-19) continues to have an unprecedented impact on business and society across the globe, David Turner, Webhelp Managing Director and CEO for the UK Group, looks at how this unexpected force will drive a revolution in homeworking, and why businesses who struggle to embrace this may be placing themselves at a serious disadvantage.

Preface
01/04/20

Since the time of writing this, just a few weeks ago, the world has changed dramatically, with entire countries entering strict lockdown periods and large regions operating under shelter in place instructions. My thoughts below on the importance of flexibility and looking after our people have become increasingly pertinent, and as a business we have done our best to respond in kind. In 12 short days, more than 6,959 of our employees are now undertaking home based or remote working, and this number will continue to rise as we work with our clients to tackle operational, technical and logistical challenges.

I owe a huge debt of thanks for this incredible feat to our IT and Operations teams who continue to go above and beyond, to our many UK clients for their support in this changing environment and most importantly to all our people for their commitment and dedication.

You can read more about our current position on the Coronavirus and the key areas our people are supporting here.

It is now obvious that a seismic change is being experienced by our industry, the ramifications of which will be felt for years to come. This will alter the customer experience landscape forever, and we must be both responsible and responsive in meeting this challenge.

David Turner

We are living in astonishing times, and the whole world is watching as Governments and scientists argue over the best approach to safeguard the health of populations, to look after the vulnerable and to keep the global economy stable.

And there is no doubt that related conversations are happening within the worldwide business community, debating the best strategies and most flexible solutions to keep the wheels of work turning and employees safe and well looked after.

 

At Webhelp, our people are our top priority, and we are reacting quickly, providing daily guidance and working with our clients and community to ensure that everyone across the business is informed and as equipped as possible to face what is likely to be a period of rapid change.

The UK, and the rest of the world, is now facing the biggest economic and social upheaval since the Second World War, and as we did during that challenging period, we must be ready to rise to meet some unprecedented changes in the status quo.

The transformation of the wartime workforce is well documented, with the image of Rosie the Riveter in her coveralls and red bandanna alongside the slogan “We Can Do It!” becoming one of the best-known icons of World War II. Now as then, we need to call upon new ways of thinking and using resources and people that we have in the best, most innovative ways.

It is a time for increased flexibility, and this isn’t something businesses should be afraid of. In fact Forbes studies confirm that increasing flexibility creates significant improvements in morale, productivity, and engagement - especially when employees are given the option to work remotely or to an adaptable schedule.

It has been my experience, which is backed by evidence from The International Journal of Economics, that flexibility in working hours reduces employee work stress, improves their mental and physical stability – which in turn creates greater effectiveness and efficiency, determination and coordination.

I completely understand that some business may be wary of remote working, perhaps due to the feeling that they can no longer control or measure the number of hours their employees are working.

Mark Davidson, Chief Operating Officer at Webhelp, suggests that we can alleviate this concern in the following way:

“When considering remote working, it is important to set clear and consistent goals and maintain a results orientated approach, making sure that employee focus remains firmly on tangible gains and objectives.”

Added to this, actually going into the office creates a less productive environment – as The Wall Street Journal notes: “Office workers are interrupted–or self-interrupted–roughly every three minutes.” And, after interruption it takes almost half an hour to get back on focus to their original task.

There is no doubt that along with COVID-19, a radical change is coming, whether we are ready for it or not - and business that mobilise NOW to embrace this new way of working, will find themselves ahead of the curve in relation to their less adaptable competitors, and way ahead in terms of resilience and productivity.

Remote working is becoming the new normal with CNN Business reporting that companies like Microsoft, Facebook, Google, Twitter and Amazon have already implemented remote working policies for many or all of their employees around the globe.

There is now no time to waste, as reporter Sean Peak for Business News Daily concludes:

“Instead of resisting the change, organizations should improve their remote work policies and capabilities.”

As a people-first business, we are committed to taking a human approach to this crisis and using the technology we have to safeguard all our colleagues, which means rapidly looking at ways to increase our infrastructure to support homeworking where possible.

This isn’t a universal solution, and we know that homeworking won’t be the correct answer for every business objective, including some within our own operations. This will have to be a managed process, which might not be suitable for the full range of employees. Finding the correct balance will be something that will take co-operation, innovation and experience.

Many in the business community think that at, this stage in the game, we can only wait and wonder, however, I firmly believe that brands who use this precious (fast decreasing) window to take decisive action to look after their people, and put strategies and logistics for a degree of homeworking in place, will reap the benefits both in the short term and in the uncertain future.

   Homeworking - the facts!
 

  • Remote employees work an additional 1.4 more days per month than in-office employees, which is nearly 17 additional workdays a year.
  • Remote employees take longer breaks on average than office employees (22 minutes versus 18 minutes, respectively), but they work an additional 10 minutes a day. On balance, for a 50 week time period this translates into an increase of approximately 3.57 extra working days a year.
  • Office workers are unproductive for an average 37 minutes a day, not including lunch or breaks, whereas remote employees are unproductive for only 27 minutes. That’s almost six more days’ worth of productivity annually!
 * Data Airtasker 2019

 


Communications specialist, Rebecca Price, on emotion and customer behaviours

 

In part 6 of our blog serialisation of the latest Webhelp whitepaper “Emotion: Establishing emotional connections with customers: What brands need to know” Guest writer, Brand and communications specialist, Rebecca Price, Partner, Frank, Bright and Abel talks about how brands can use emotional connection to lead to profitable customer behaviours.

How can brands create emotional connections?

Without a clear brand purpose,that goes beyond practical product or service benefits, customers might not see any reasons to commit to a brand. A brand purpose focuses on the more emotional, social and ethical benefits the company stands for. As new generations become paying customers, we’re seeing brand purpose become increasingly important in terms of creating meaningful emotional connections, as organizational purpose and values are key purchase decision factors.

Customers are self-informed and very savvy when it comes to making brand choices. To compete, brands need to make sure their purpose is compelling, and bring it to life in the competitive landscape and on key issues. Often, apart from the point of sale, customers experience a brand when they have questions or a problem that needs solving. This means that brands should think of their purpose in a wide context of great products, presence in the community, and very importantly, through the customer experience.

Brand purpose strengthens customer connection. When combined with brand values and all the other things that constitute a brand, this connection can be very powerful and lead to profitable customer behaviours.

How do you create a compelling brand purpose?

Core to defining a brand’s purpose is a deep understanding of the customer. Today, that goes beyond traditional demographics and incorporates customer behaviours – and even ideologies. Purpose-driven brands need to have an ideology too.

Before a brand can determine “why” it exists, it needs to determine what it stands for, and what it’s willing to fight for. A strong brand evolves over time, and having a strong ideology provides the compass needed to remain consistent and likeable over time.

Brands and customer relationships are based on emotion. This means that brands need to have authentic, ‘on brand’, two way conversations, and consider how those conversations will impact customer sentiment.

How can brands help their people connect with customers?

To help employees represent the brand effectively to customers, employers are increasingly focusing on benchmarking, enhancing or recalibrating their employer brands. Employees live the brand through their behaviours, so helping them to understand and live the brand’s purpose and values is vital – particularly in customer service environments.

Employees essentially act as brand advocates, so the potential to positively impact customer perceptions through customer engagement is huge.

You can follow blog the serialisation, and join the conversation, on the Webhelp LinkedIn and Twitter sites or read the Whitepaper in full below.


Brand humanity – what it is and why it works!

 

In part 5 of our blog serialisation of the latest Webhelp whitepaper “Emotion: Establishing emotional connections with customers: What brands need to know” John Leighton Head of Customer Service, easyJet, shares his view on why emotional connection is essential for brands.

Emotional connection is innately important to easyJet’s brand positioning and it’s come naturally. We’re starting to really push the fact that we’re a retailer, not an airline, and we recognise that as a retailer, we’re retailing products that are extremely emotional.

So, as we’ve evolved it’s happened, but our focus continues to strengthen; for instance, it’s a foundation for our relationship with Webhelp.

Measurement of emotional connection isn’t yet ‘on point’ in our industry. In fact, the way the customer service industry measures things – voice of the customer, customer satisfaction, customer effort, etc. – is actually quite linear. We’re doing some interesting work with Webhelp, powered by its business intelligence team, to understand when and how customers are coming in, why they’re calling, what the true behavioural outcomes are – rather than customer-stated outcomes. This will be important in helping us understand the monetary value of emotional connection.

Measuring the monetary impact of emotional connection is much easier for a subscription model when you know your customer base and can see customer reaction to things that you ‘tweak’ – be it service innovation or pricing, for example.

Our own understanding of this will be helped by easyJet’s launch of easyJet Holidays which will give us much greater insights into the links between personal motivators and what products our customers buy. As such, we’ll be able to anticipate what people want from travel and facilitate that need. The product positioning and the sell will be easier as it’s about offering things that will enhance what customers want – and what they’re doing.

There are challenges however. Organisational silos – and even the way companies do things – can get in the way. Despite the industry lamenting it for decades, ‘Service’ is generally still a cost centre, whereas ‘Sales’ is a profit centre.

If you apply that to the airline industry today, this poses challenges. Why is the customer flying? Do they want/need bags? Do they have a new baby? This insight is across marketing, sales, AND customer service…

In terms of the human skills required to build emotional connection, we know that authenticity is key, and we are working internally and with Webhelp on how to make our customer experiences authentic.

We also know that advisor longevity is a key contributor to emotionally connected customers, and Webhelp is a strong force to be reckoned with in this area. For instance, advisor tenure in Cape Town has led to the highest levels of customer satisfaction across the entire company (EasyJet estate).

To conclude, I would be remiss if I didn’t confirm that data is essential to build emotional connections with customers. It’s not just important to have it, but to actually use it purposefully to understand what’s important to customers.

The future is about micro-segmentation based on expert use of data. By understanding who customers are, what pushes their buttons, and what their personal motivations for travel are, and combining this understanding with ‘human’ customer experience, we will be able to create strong bonds with specific customers. For example, at weekends they’re a family customer, but during the week they’re a business customer. Their wants and needs – and expectations – throughout the entire customer journey need to be treated differently.

You can follow blog the serialisation, and join the conversation, on the Webhelp LinkedIn and Twitter sites or read the Whitepaper in full below.

 


Webhelp Enterprise: Innovating B2B Sales by Innovating People

This is the second installment of a series of interviews conducted by Stephen Loynd of market intelligence firm TrendzOwl with Etienne Turion, CEO, Webhelp Enterprise Sales, regarding the B2B sales market in the United States.

Stephen Loynd, Principal Analyst, TrendzOwl:

After our last discussion, it’s hard not to conclude that B2B sales is in the midst of a revolution.

We’re seeing a fundamental behavioral shift in B2B buyers. As you pointed out during our prior conversation, there’s a rapid reduction in field sales and an accompanying shift toward inside sales. And according to Gartner, B2B services budgets are expected to increase in 2020, and the budgetary allocation for B2B marketing is poised to increase the most. This sets the stage for increased outsourcing of the B2B function in pursuit of bringing down costs while increasing performance.

Etienne Turion, CEO, Webhelp Enterprise Sales:

That’s indeed good news. But the nuances involved in B2B sales are many, and success isn’t guaranteed.

Consider the importance of self-service, for example. As we discussed last time, many organizations do their research online and then purchase online, many preferring not to interact with a sales rep as they decide what to purchase on their own. As such, much of the buying journey is complete before the first sales contact; sometimes, buying decisions may already have been made.

This means that while B2B sales reps are still necessary, the discussions they must have with prospects are often complex and require the ability to negotiate and show empathy. It’s a consultative sale. After all, in B2B sales, the customer is not a company per se, but rather an individual or group seeking to make their professional lives simpler through the purchase of a product or service. We must remember that. I think this is why Forrester, in a December, 2019, webinar, estimated that sellers’ engagement will increase by some 10% – even as more transactions close digitally!

Stephen Loynd, Principal Analyst, TrendzOwl:

I like how you’re making this discussion about people first.

Let’s talk a little bit more about your global team of 3,500 people (and counting). Webhelp Enterprise Sales has provided inside sales services since 2002, with a large number of B2B clients across sectors. Its multilingual services are available in 35 countries. You’ve got 1,500 people dedicated to the U.S. market.

So how do you instill this idea of a consultative approach across your entire organization?

Etienne Turion, CEO, Webhelp Enterprise Sales:

Great question. Because trust is everything in B2B sales, Webhelp believes in a “people first” paradigm that is client centric. Over the years, Webhelp has gone from a French company, to a European company, and now with our move into the United States, a truly global company. In the U.S., most of our clients are in the Bay Area and Seattle. In fact, 80% of our B2B portfolio is in the IT world with U.S.-based companies that include much of Big Tech. We’ve been a part of the American Association of Inside Sales Professionals (AAISP) for the past two years.

As for our salespeople – they are asked to consider the aspirations and challenges of those they are selling to. Obviously, these particulars will vary depending on the industry and job title of the prospect. Approaches and thought-leadership content aimed at clients are tailored to suit the person and situation at hand. Any truly effective B2B sales campaign makes clear how a certain solution or product can effect real change in the routine of the prospect. And sometimes, prospects learn how they might benefit from a product or service in unexpected ways, reinforcing the sales process.

In effect, we’re asking our people to care about the people they engage with.

An essential part of that process is asking the right questions, complemented by aggressive listening. Salespeople that have an authentic interest in learning about their prospects (oftentimes through social media) always perform at a higher level. True engagement with prospects can often mean allowing those prospects to drive the conversation, producing new insights into the customer in turn. It’s a way of bringing a certain creativity to enterprise sales.

Stephen Loynd, Principal Analyst, TrendzOwl:

What you’re describing is the central importance of people skills.

It makes me think of a recent number I saw in a headline. According to Forrester, 59% of buyers prefer to do research online instead of interacting with a sales rep because too often the rep pushes a sales  agenda rather than helps solve a problem.

Etienne Turion, CEO, Webhelp Enterprise Sales:

Absolutely. This is why Webhelp believes in challenging our people to become better, more empathetic, and to grow in every role. Emotional intelligence is key. You know, that same Forrester webinar that I mentioned earlier (from December, 2019) reported that 64% of B2B employees in a leadership role at “customer obsessed” companies say that their senior-level execs put themselves in the customers shoes! I love that idea of customer obsession.

Webhelp has found that the best B2B salespeople not only become deep subject matter experts, but they do it with an authentic conviction and passion that can surmount the skepticism that seems so prevalent in too many potential buyers today. In the eyes of a potential buyer, that kind of professionalism can be the difference between winning a contract or fading into irrelevance.

So at Webhelp, events and contests featuring both monetary and non-monetary incentives are organized each quarter to boost engagement and drive performance for everyone from telemarketers to advisors and team leaders. And constructive competitiveness is encouraged. Meanwhile, top performers’ best practices are often identified and shared with other advisors involved in a campaign through workshops, collective coaching sessions, and peer-to-peer coaching or training.

Stephen Loynd, Principal Analyst, TrendzOwl:

But how do you incentivize your salespeople specifically?

Etienne Turion, CEO, Webhelp Enterprise Sales:

Agents are provided visibility on any potential bonus that their performance could trigger and alerted to any performance gaps that might impact the next bonus threshold. At the same time, advisors’ bonuses rely heavily on their own performance and are fully aligned with the value drivers of the relevant contract. There is a detailed process to collect and prioritize opportunities for improvement on the frontline and within client management teams, as well as with business intelligence (BI).

Integral to that process is involving the frontline in solution design and the testing of processes; solutions are generated, discussed, selected, and documented with those frontline team members. Salespeople are a part of our success. Inevitably, leaders emerge.

Stephen Loynd, Principal Analyst, TrendzOwl:

These past few years I’ve talked a lot about how companies today need to be working with partners that are thinking about how quickly the future is arriving; because providers that are asking hard questions, and seeking real solutions to disruptive trends, will be prized. Providers need to be able to ponder how fast things are changing.

For example, what is on the technology horizon for customer engagement as it undergoes its own form of digital transformation?  What is the role of exponential technological change in customer engagement?  What will it mean to deliver truly immersive customer experiences in the future? It seems to me that your best people need to understand this theme of exponential change.

Etienne Turion, CEO, Webhelp Enterprise Sales:

There’s an inference in all those questions you posed, and it has everything to do with the blending of technology with the talent and promise of human beings!

In essence, the relationship between human beings and technology is being reinvented before our eyes.  Industries are changing, and companies would be wise to seek out strategic partners that understand that technology must be married with the talents of people in a way that makes sense. 

And when it comes to B2B sales, there’s no doubt about it – people and technology working in concert will boost this industry too as it approaches a turning-point. Forrester talks about how B2B marketing is now part of what they call an “AI-powered future.” That future is just about here, embedded in modern marketing technology. I look forward to digging into this theme in our next talk.

Summary: Pillars of Success

In summary, Etienne Turion emphasized how important it is to have a company philosophy that centers on people, and that rests on the following pillars (areas that every member of the Webhelp team can understand):

  • Attracting the best. Job ads use the correct key words and format so as to attract the best sales associates and differentiate from regular call center job ads.
  • B2B training is offered to people in relevant areas, from sales to soft skills.
  • Appreciating talent. A vigorous talent management policy pertains throughout the organization.
  • Retaining the best. The company has a specific salary grid for B2B positions (including bonus policy), allowing it to attract and retain the best talent in all required languages.
  • The working environment is adapted to B2B projects and designed to attract the best people (ie, large desks, second screen, laptops, break rooms, etc.).
  • Career path. The company has defined and communicated a specific career path for sales associates.

Next – Webhelp Enterprise Sales in the United States: Pursuing a Seamless Digital Experience through Technology with a Human Touch

 

Would you like to know more about our solutions?

Etienne TurionContact

Etienne Turion
Mobile: +33(0)6 85 52 76 10
Email: etienne.turion@webhelp.com


Brand humanity – what it is and why it works!

In part 3 of our blog serialisation of the latest Webhelp whitepaper “Emotion: Establishing emotional connections with customers: What brands need to know” A driving force in the ‘Think Human’ re-brand, Polly Ashdown, Marketing & Communications Director Webhelp UK, India & South Africa, reveals how brand humanity can create positive emotion and prevent disruption in CX.

As the range of digital consumer platforms and devices multiply, customer relationships are increasingly being disrupted by digital communications. Used to getting what they want when they want it, customers now expect brands to interact with them across each touch-point consistently – and in line with their expectations.

The brands that are able to speak with customers – rather than at them – will create and reinforce emotional connection. As our new YouGov consumer research shows, the impact of brand humanity on consumer behaviour cannot be underestimated. And neither can the impact on measurable outcomes including spend, loyalty and advocacy.

But how important is this connection to the customer, and consequentially to brands? Overall, 40% of consumers report feeling an emotional connection to a brand, and this connection makes them behave in different ways towards the brand.

In fact, of those who said they feel an emotional connection to one or more brands, 54% of people are prepared to pay slightly more for products/services, 66% are more loyal to the brand, 55% are likely to purchase other products/services, 63% recommend the brand to family and friends, and 49% share experiences of the brand.

Revealingly, only 4% of customers reported that having an emotional connection to a brand would NOT make them behave in a particular way, when talking to friends and family.

And these results become all the more interesting when we look at the source of emotional connection. The top 5 ways in which people feel emotionally connected to a brand are: The overall customer experience (53%), The brand is easy to deal with (38%), The brand’s values are similar to mine (34%), The quality of interactions with the brand (26%), The brand is ‘human’ (22%).

As we can see, customers reward brands who successfully demonstrate humanity with loyalty, advocacy, and their cash. If brands are perceived as ‘human’, customers are more likely to: Emotionally connect with the brand (net likely 56%), Go back to the brand repeatedly, rather than trying a different brand (net more likely 69%), Spend more money with the brand (net ‘more likely’ 61%), Recommend the brand to other people (net ‘more likely’ 67%). People in the ABC1 (the three higher social and economic groups) bracket are more likely than C2DE (the three lower social and economic groups) respondents to take positive actions towards a brand because it feels ‘human’.

Brands therefore have an opportunity to leverage emotional connection as a powerful driver of positive behaviours with customers with disposable income.


Brands that really ‘get’ the importance of a human angle look at making connection in the most human way possible. They’re less focused on the transaction – i.e. of selling the product, or answering the question – they’re focused on building trust, anticipating customer needs, and giving customers the edge. They know that consistency is key to trust and credibility, and focus on the entire experience, rather than one element of the customer journey.


In a nutshell, brands that are human are good at building relationships. They design customer experience from the customer’s ‘ideal’ of a relationship, and with a good understanding of their motivations. Customer insight and analytics are key to making sure that everything – from messaging, the language and channels used – correspond to the customer’s ‘ideal’.

At Webhelp, we’re using customer insight and analytics to create experiences that are human. While technology is inevitably core to customer experience, we always view technology from the standpoint of how it can augment the end to end experience and bring out the best in people.


Consider emotional connection as a hierarchy. Clearly, there are functional “transactional” things that need to ‘get done’, but there are experiences that need to happen in order to form emotional connection, and achieve the holy grail of loyalty and advocacy.


You can follow blog the serialisation, and join the conversation, on the Webhelp LinkedIn and Twitter sites or read the Whitepaper in full below.